How to Organize a Glass Classroom Event

Next week, for the second time in two years, MNW will be hosting, Montessori in the Square, a public glass classroom event in the the heart of downtown Portland. While it may seem like a tremendous undertaking, we feel it is one of the best and most unique ways to raise awareness about Montessori.

In response to numerous requests following the 2013 International Montessori Congress, MNW published a document entitled, "Organize a Glass Classroom Event of Your Own!" This resource includes tips about creating an event timeline, developing  floor plan, how to publicize the event, what promotional items to create, and more.

Click on the photo above to download a free copy!

Click on the photo above to download a free copy!

So, if you've been considering organizing a glass classroom event in your community, click on the photo to the right to get started. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

Posted on July 23, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Elementary, Portland, Primary, Public Event.

MNW in the UP

In case you don't know, UP stands for Upper Peninsula (the part of Michigan that is like Wisconsin's hat), which is where MNW Director of Elementary Training, Elise Huneke-Stone, recently presented a two day workshop called "An Exploration of Writing" as part of the Elementary Alumni Association (AMI-EAA) Annual Summer Conference. Elise's workshop had participants playing a variety of writing games designed to inspire elementary children to experiment with writing--so that they will discover that writing is creative, enjoyable, safe, and interesting. “In my experience,” says Elise, “adults need this assurance more than children do, but an adult who is uncomfortable with writing is less able to inspire children to take pleasure in it.” 

When asked what she learned at the this energetic and hands on workshop, EAA member, Marty Shepard, summed it up, "Think outside the box! Do activities to generate ideas and writing topics. Writing is recording life. Give them life experiences so they can write with ease, enthusiasm, expression, and energy. Writing is fun!"

To learn about Elementary and other teacher training programs and Montessori Northwest, CLICK HERE! 

Left & Top Right: Participants learning writing games. Bottom Right: The PNW contingent attending the conference.

Left & Top Right: Participants learning writing games. Bottom Right: The PNW contingent attending the conference.

Posted on July 21, 2014 and filed under Elementary, Workshops.

Cleaning Day--More than Soap and Water

Today was Cleaning Day for our primary students. Cleaning Day is a treasured celebration held on the very last day of each course at Montessori Northwest. The students dust, polish, and infuse every bead, box, and basket with love and positive energy. They spend the morning laughing, cleaning, singing, and remembering happy moments as they get everything ready for oral examinations. We wish Course 38 good luck tomorrow and remind them that oral exams are a "celebration of what you know!"

Posted on July 16, 2014 and filed under Primary, Cleaning Day.

A to I Students Practice their Craft with Real Children

Observation is a foundational practice at all levels of Montessori education; for Assistants to Infancy, the babies and toddlers come to us!  Students have the opportunity to observe and take turns working with the children in our prepared environment. 

This time is especially enjoyed by parents, who accompany their children each day, and thoroughly delight in being able to sit back and observe their own children, picking up tips and ideas about how to support their children's development.

Interested in learning more about our Assistants to Infancy training?  Click here to find out more!

Posted on July 14, 2014 and filed under A-to-I.

Why You Need to Know About OMA's Sub List

Maybe an illness is working its way through your teaching staff, leaving a handful of them home ill, and you don’t have enough coverage. Or, you enjoy the rush of an early morning phone call and the anticipation of spending the day with a group of children you've never met before.

If you’ve found yourself in either of the above situations, you might be interested to know that the Oregon Montessori Association (OMA) maintains a list of substitute Montessori teachers. All OMA member schools receive a copy of list. And, individuals who are looking for work as a substitute can have their name added to the list. 

OMA works to increase the vital presence of Montessori education in the Pacific Northwest through workshops, lectures, e-mail newsletters, community outreach, strategic relationships, and more.

To learn about the how you can tap into this great resource for substitutes, please contact OMA at info@oregonmontessori.com or call 503.688.0526.

Posted on July 10, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Elementary, Primary, Resources.

Volunteer Sign-Up for Relief Nursery...

We have received many inquiries from people looking to be involved with MNW’s new collaboration with the Volunteers of American Relief Nursery. Below is the information you’ll need to move forward with that process!

 All volunteers that work at the Relief Nursery are required to be registered with the Online Central Background Registry—ensuring the safety and wellbeing for the children. You might consider this the first step towards becoming a volunteer.

 If you are not already registered, it’s easy and can now be done online. Follow this link to learn more about the Registry.

Once you’ve started that process, you’re ready to contact the Relief Nursery directly. Our contact there is Anne Rothert. She can be contact either by phone (503.236.8492 x1761) or by Email (arothert@voaor.org). From there you will slate a time to come in and fill out some preliminary paperwork, learn more about the organization, and move ahead with becoming a volunteer.

We thank you in advance to your interest in this exciting endeavor!

A Poem for Our Elementary Graduates

Elise Huneke-Stone, Montessori Northwest's Director of Elementary Training, composed a poem for the two elementary courses she's had the privilege to lead.

"It really speaks to us, because almost every line and image can be sourced back to one of our Montessori elementary key lessons." says Elise. 

We thought you might derive meaning from this composition as well. A selection from the poem is included below. Following the link on the bottom of the page will download a printable PDF version.


A Cosmic Education by Elise Huneke-Stone

For Montessori Northwest Elementary Courses 1 and 2, and for the rest of us who are part of this line. 

This is a line, and this is a line.
Pronouns shadow the shape of their antecedents,
liquids fill every hollow, the river carves and carries,
you listen to the stories that others have heard before you.
On their convergent lines, the children of geometry smile,
and the fundamental needs of humans are met
in the voice of the verb, on the agent of an arrow,
on a tiny drop of heat and light,
in the little life cupped in the seeds we sow.

Elementary Workshop Weekend!

Elementary Workshop Weekend:  Stories and Self-Construction

download a flyer download a printable registration form

Montessori elementary children explore the legacy and creative power of language.  Montessori adults, too, can learn much from an in-depth investigation of stories and the roles they play in development and in the transmission of culture. The stories we tell the children as a framework for Cosmic Education, the stories the children tell us, in their journals and in our conferences with them, and the stories we tell each other in our class meetings or gatherings: All contribute greatly to shaping the Montessori elementary experience, and contribute to optimal development for the children.   

In this weekend workshop, we will examine the Great Stories (including the Great River, from the Bergamo tradition) in terms of how they contribute to children’s intellectual and emotional well-being. Participants will also explore practical ways to start and sustain the children’s journals and individual conferences, and to help the children develop these Tools of Responsibility in accordance with their growing independence and self-awareness. The workshop will conclude with a focus on how to implement a developmentally appropriate class meeting that meets the children’s social needs and empowers them as citizens in the “practice society” of the Montessori elementary community.

Intended Audience

Elementary Teachers and Assistants 

Schedule

Friday, October 10, 2014 6-9PM

Saturday, October 11, 2014 8:30AM-4PM

Sunday, October 12, 2014 9AM-12PM

Cost

$250 Early Bird Discount (before Sept 26th) / $285 full price (On or After Sept 26th)

10% discount for schools registering 3 or more attendees - Lunch included

download a flyer here

download a printable registration form here

housing and travel information here

Registration Online Here:
Add To Cart
Posted on June 27, 2014 and filed under Elementary, From our Trainers, Resources.

Montessori Environments for Dementia Conference

The first International Montessori Environments for Dementia Conference is being held in Sydney, Australia!

The Montessori approach aims to support the full development of the human being. It is a person-centered approach that draws on the capacity of human beings to learn and develop from within. If we provide the appropriate support and the best possible environment, we will continue to be amazed at the incredible capability to learn at any age. Whether it be infants, children, adolescents or the elderly, all human beings seek to be independent, to participate in meaningful activity, and to make a contribution. Montessori provides the practical ways to support this at all stages of life.

The International Montessori Environments for Dementia Conference promises to bring together some of the international leaders in the field, covering some really interesting topics. Here are just a few of the workshop titles:

  • Dementia Specific Residential Gardens
  • Engaging People Living with Younger Onset Dementia with Their Community and the Workforce
  • Creating Memory Books
  • Art Therapy – A Restorative Model for People Living with Dementia
  • Changing the World for People Living with Dementia with the Capability Model that Includes Developing
  • Roles and Activities for Residents that Reflect the Montessori Principles
  • Individualized Music: Bringing Out the Person Not the Illness

For more information on this interesting event, visit their website here.


Posted on June 27, 2014 and filed under Resources, Public Event.

Congratulations to our Recent Graduate!

Congratulations to recent MNW Elementary Graduate, Robert Rivera, for receiving a scholarship from the AMI MES Fund!

AMI/USA established the MES FUND, INC., the first financial aid fund to benefit AMI teacher trainees, in honor of Margaret Elizabeth Stephenson, who devoted her life to AMI teacher training in the United States. The fund, which is administered and supported by AMI/USA, honors her legacy and extends her contribution to touch future teachers.

The fund awards partial scholarships in the form of tuition reduction towards AMI training in the United States to selected students. AMI/USA hopes, through their support of this fund, to ensure that qualified individuals seeking AMI training will be able to pursue that dream, regardless of their financial circumstances.

We found his quote particularly inspiring:

“I’ve had the privilege to create a community who strives to prepare children to create our world’s future. My trainer, Elise Huneke-Stone, was trained by Miss Stephenson, and I’m honored to continue this cosmic legacy. Dr. Montessori’s vision, Miss Stephenson’s dedication, and Elise’s passion have shaped my love for our work. As I join the community at the International Montessori School Hong Kong, I hold in my heart that the MES fund has made this dream possible.”

Interested in learning more about this scholarship and there other recipients? http://amiusa.org/financial-aid/

Primary Weekend Workshop Announced!

SELF-DISCIPLINE AND JOYFUL LEARNING:NORMALIZATION IN THE 21ST CENTURY MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S HOUSE

download a flyer / download a printable registration form

Normalization is a key element of Montessori theory for successful early childhood education. Montessori’s writings indicate that we do not need normalized children to do our work. Instead, our work is to help children achieve normalization. She identifies normalization as ‘the most important single result of our whole work’ – the result that makes all other personal, social, and academic achievements possible; and she assures us that if we understand how to ‘normalize the conditions’, then joyful engagement, spontaneous concentration, self-discipline, literacy, and practical mathematics are within the potential of every child, and social cohesion is within the potential of every group.

In this weekend workshop, we will explore Montessori’s theory of normalization in relation to the materials and activities found in a Montessori 3-6 classroom: how to first offer motives for concentrated activity leading to normalization and then turn this point of arrival into a point of departure through the materials for development in Sensorial, Language, and Mathematics.  Observation, friendliness with error, and indirect preparation will give further focus to this exploration across all of the areas and all of the ages in the Children’s House environment.

Intended Audience

Primary Teachers and Assistants

Schedule

Friday, October 10, 2014 6-9PM

Saturday, October 11, 2014 8:30AM-4PM

Sunday, October 12, 2014 9AM-12PM

Cost

$250 Early Bird Discount (before Sept 26th) / $285 full price (On or After Sept 26th) - Lunch included

10% discount for schools registering 3 or more attendees - Lunch included

download a flyer / download a printable registration form here

housing and travel information here

Registration Online Here:
Add To Cart


MNW Trainers Published in Latest NAMTA Journal

We are delighted to note that both Sarah Werner Andrews & Ginni Sackett, both of MNW’s Co-Directors of Primary Training, are featured in the most recent NAMTA journal.

The North American Montessori Teacher's Association (NAMTA) links Montessorians with their legacy and their future. Its services include print publications, audio visuals, conferences, and research. 

One of NAMTA's  endeavors is the publication of a quarterly journal. This publication includes articles by Dr Montessori as well as scholarly papers on Montessori and related topics. 

The most recent NAMTA Journal - Vol. 39 #2, Spring 2014 - is dedicated to "Breaking the Poverty Cycle: Social Retooling of the Montessori First Plane".

The NAMTA Journal is typically only available to NAMTA members, but we’ve received permission to make available these great articles for you to enjoy and share!

Ginni Sackett's Article:  "The Lines That Make the Clouds" The Essence of the Mathematical Mind in the First Six Years of Life (download)

Sarah Werner Andrews' Article:  Joyful Engagement: Montessori's Common Core Standard (download)

If you’re interested in obtaining the full journal for yourself, it can be purchased here.  

Welcome to A-to-I Course #5!

The first three years of life are a critical foundation for development. The AMI Assistants to Infancy training provides the knowledge and confidence needed to support infants, toddlers, and their families in both in-home and school-based settings.

The AMI Assistants to Infancy course offers a comprehensive study of Montessori theory and practice to work with children aged birth to three in home environments and toddler classroom environments. During 625 hours of teacher preparation, students thoroughly explore Montessori philosophy, human development, Montessori infant and toddler activities/materials, and expectations for Montessori professional communities. (learn more here)

Please say hello to the new Assistants-to-Infancy Course (#5) that started this week. Such a wonderful bunch of enthusiastic people!

Summertime and the Montessori Child

Here's a great article from our friends at MariaMontessori.com

For children who are at home during the summer break, parents will wish to work diligently with slowing the pace of life.  Children will savor the leisurely passage of time in which they can relish individual choices, uninterrupted play, ample rest and sleep, unhurried meals and unplugged screens.  Here are just a few ideas of how a child can fill her long lovely summer days and return to school refreshed, nourished and eager:

  • Read beautiful, appropriate books (remember, the school has book lists to offer).  For the older Children’s House child, begin a chapter book that will develop into a repetitive ritual that she will look forward to and remember with warmth and happiness.  Have long leisurely conversations about the characters, the places visited, the sights and smells.  Provide large blank sheets of paper and crayons or watercolors and invite the child to illustrate parts of the story she remembers. Collect these into a handmade book of illustrations.
  • Resist the need to provide a playmate or to be a playmate for your child on a regular basis, but instead, honor her ability to find her own entertainment and source of activity.  Play-dates are fine for an occasional get-together, but children really do enjoy their own company when given the opportunity to figure it out and enact upon their own ingenuity.  The child’s play will reflect what is going on in her world, for this is the source of her imaginings.
  • Do not be afraid of boredom, for this is the passage to imaginative, interesting activity of the child’s own choosing.
  • Provide long extended periods of outside play with freedom to construct, dig, shovel and explore to heart’s content.  Resist staging and choosing for the child and instead, encourage the blossoming of his own imaginative play efforts.

Read the remainder of this article, and many others, at MariaMontessori.com

Posted on June 19, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Articles, Elementary, Primary, Resources.

17th Century Learning

It's always fascinating to see the context of our work. Below is an excerpt from a great article regarding what many consider to be the first picture book dedicated to the education of young children, Orbis Sensualium Pictus – or The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures, as it was rendered in English in 1705.

The researcher Charles McNamara explores how the book can be seen to be as much about the invisible world as the visible--a theme that probably resonates with a lot of Montessorians.

John Comenius’ Orbis Sensualium Pictus (or The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures) is, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, “the first children’s picture book.” Originally published in 1658 in Latin and German, the Orbis — with its 150 pictures showing everyday activities like brewing beer, tending gardens, and slaughtering animals — is immediately familiar as an ancestor of today’s children’s literature. This approach centered on the visual was a breakthrough in education for the young, as was the decision to teach the vernacular in addition to Latin. Unlike treatises on education and grammatical handbooks, it is aimed directly at the young and attempts to engage on their level.

The Orbis was hugely popular. At one point it was the most used textbook in Europe for elementary education, and according to one account it was translated into “most European and some of the Oriental languages.” Its author John Comenius, a Czech by birth, was also well-known throughout Europe and worked in several countries as a school reformer. His portrait was painted by Rembrandt, and according to an 1887 edition of the Orbis, Comenius was even “once solicited to become President of Harvard College.” Even if he is less celebrated today by name, his innovative ideas about education are still influential. In his Didactica Magna, for example, he advocates for equal educational opportunities for all: boys and girls, rich and poor, urban and rural.

Illustration for the sounds, from the 1705 English edition of Orbis Sensualium Pictus

Despite his progressive aims and lasting educational influence, Comenius does not come off as a thoroughly modern schoolmaster. When we turn to the first page of the Orbis, we find an opening sentence that would seem peculiar in today’s children’s books: “Come, boy, learn to be wise.” We see above the text a teacher and student in dialogue, the former holding up his finger and sporting a cane and large hat, the latter listening in an emotional state somewhere between awe and anxiety. The student asks, “What doth this mean, to be wise?” His teacher answers, “To understand rightly, to do rightly, and to speak out rightly all that are necessary.”

The first chapter of the Orbis looks to the third of these goals in what reads like an early version of “Old MacDonald Had a Farm.” Children learn how “to speak out rightly” by imitating animal noises. These two pages are a trove of Latin onomatopoetic verbs and peculiar renderings of animal sounds: cats cry out “nau nau” instead of “meow meow,” and we learn that “the Duck quacketh," “the Hare squeaketh," and “the Crow crieth.” This introduction to animal noises is familiar territory for modern educational toys. The teacher explains that first the student must learn “the plain sounds…which living creatures know how to make, and thy tongue knoweth how to imitate.” After mastering these noises, the student and teacher “will go into the World, and we will view all things.”

After thirty-five chapters on theology, elements, plants, and animals, Comenius finally introduces man. He again opts for the Biblical account and addresses Adam and Eve before more immediate topics like “The Outward Parts of a Man,” where we learn that women have “two Dugs” and that below the stomach we find “the Groyn and the privities.” The anatomical terminology is vast, including words for each finger and for a number of bones in the body. But amid instruction on the corporeal and familiar, Comenius again injects the abstract and invisible into his picture book with Chapter 43, a discussion of “The Soul of Man.” A dotted outline of a human, opening his arms as if to welcome the students’ gaze, stands at the top of the page. Despite this illustration, Comenius’ discussion of the soul is not dumbed down for children. He lays out the categories of souls for his young students: the “Vegetative” soul of plants, the “Sensitive” soul of animals, and the “Rational” soul of man.

Illustration for “The Soul”

Opening illustration of Master and Child

Opening illustration of Master and Child

The final page, mirroring the first, again shows the teacher speaking and the young student listening attentively. But in his second appearance, the student says nothing: we might say Comenius’ lesson was not a matter of dialogue and discussion but of assiduous memorization. The teacher, too, seems to have changed his approach. He tells the student, “thou hast seen in short, all things that can be shewed,” but he recommends that the student also “read other good Books diligently” so that he may become “learned, wise, and godly.”

Read the original full article here.

Let Your Baby Teach US!

**Thank you to all the people that contacted us--We are no longer looking for additional infants.**

Montessori Northwest invites you to a very special opportunity to enrich your child’s earliest experiences! 

Download a flyer here.

Download a flyer here.

Our Assistants to Infancy course trains adults to care for children from birth to three years of age. As part of their training, our students participate in observing and supervised practice teaching with infants and toddlers. 

What to Expect

In a warm, home-like setting, students gently care for your baby’s needs: playing, feeding, soothing, changing, and assisting with sleep, under the supervision of experienced teachers using Montessori principles. Other students observe from a discreet distance. You remain close by, observing or participating as you and baby feel comfortable. Please note that this if for babies 0 - 10 months old.

Meet Your Montessorians

Participating parents receive support and guidance from Montessori teacher trainer Nancy Lechner and experienced course assistants, with many opportunities to discuss questions about your child’s growth and development. 

Nancy has worked with young children since 1977, and holds diplomas from the Association Montessori Internationale at the Assistant to Infancy, Primary, and Special Education levels. She has presented parent workshops and staff development in California, Oregon, Texas, Australia, and Europe.

Nancy will be assisted by Gloria Singh & Morgan Spivey

Times, Dates, and other Details

  • July 7 to August 1, 2014
  • Monday to Friday, 9AM-11:30AM Montessori Northwest
  • 622 SE Grand Ave, Portland, OR 97214 **Free of charge to participating families** 

Space is limited; preference is given to those who can commit to the entire four week session. If you are interested in participating, please contact Gloria Singh, Course Assistant, at gloria@montessori-nw.org or call Montessori Northwest at (503) 963-8992. 

 

 

Posted on June 10, 2014 .

Gandhi Speaks at Montessori Training College

Speech At Montessori Training College 
Mohandas K. Gandhi

London , [ October 28, 1931 ]

(Note: Dr. Maria Montessori met Mahatma Gandhi in the beginning of October, 1931 in London. And on October 28, 1931 Gandhi spoke at the Montessori Training College in London where Dr. Montessori was also in attendance. What follows is the text of Gandhi’s Speech, which was published in the weekly newspaper, Young India, on November 19, 1931. For further information and/or discussions on this topic, please contact Shall Sinha at shall@ssinha.com )

Madame, you have overwhelmed me with your words. It is perfectly true, I must admit it in all humility, that however indifferently it may be, I endeavor to represent love in every fiber of my being. I am impatient to realize the presence of my Maker, Who to me embodies Truth, and in the early part of my career I discovered that if I was to realize Truth I must obey, even at the cost of my life, the law of love. And having been blessed with children, I discovered that the law of Love could be best understood and learned through little children.

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Were it not for us, their ignorant poor parents, our children would be perfectly innocent. I believe implicitly that the child is not born mischievous in the bad sense of the term. If parents would behave themselves whilst the child is growing, before it is born and after, it is a well-known fact that the child would instinctively obey the law of Truth and the law of Love.

And when I understood this lesson in the early part of my life, I began a gradual but distinct change in life. I do not propose to describe to you the several phases through which this stormy life of mine has passed, but I can only, in truth and in perfect humility, bear witness to the fact that to the extent that I have represented Love in my life, in thought, word and deed I have realized the “peace that passeth understanding”. I have baffled many of my friends when they have noticed in me peace that they have envied, and they have asked me for the cause of that priceless possession. I have not been able to explain the cause by saying that, if my friends found that peace in me, it was due to my attempt to obey this, the greatest law of our being.

It was in 1915 when I reached India , that I first became acquainted with your activities. It was in a place called Amreli that I found that there was a little school being conducted after the Montessori system. Your name had preceded that first acquaintance. I found no difficulty in finding out at once that this school was not carrying out the spirit of your teaching; the letter was there, but whilst there was an honest - more or less honest - effort being made, I saw too that there was a great deal of tinsel about it. I came in touch, then, with more such schools, and the more I came in touch, the more I began to understand that the foundation was good and splendid, if the children could be taught through the laws of nature - nature, consistent with human dignity, not nature that governs the beast. I felt instinctively from the way in which the children were being taught that, whilst they were being indifferently taught, the original teaching was conceived in obedience to this fundamental law. Since then, I have had the pleasure of coming across several of your pupils, one of whom had even made a pilgrimage to Italy and had received your personal blessings. I was looking forward to meeting the children here and you all and it was a great pleasure to me to see these children.

I had taken care to learn something about these little children. I had a foretaste of what I saw here, in Birmingham , where there is a school between which and this there is a difference. But I also saw that there also human nature was struggling to express itself. I see the same thing here and it was a matter of inexpressible joy to me that from their childhood the children were brought to understand the virtue of silence, and how, in response to the whisper from their teacher, the children came forward one after another in that pin-drop silence. It gave great joy to see all those beautiful rhythmic movements and, as I was watching those movements of the children, my whole heart went out to the millions of the children of the semi-starved villages of India, and I asked myself as my heart went out to those children, “Is it possible for me to give them those lessons and the training that are being given under your system, to those children”?

We are conducting an experiment amongst the poorest of the children in India . I do not know how far the experiment will go. We have the problem of giving real vital education to these children of India 's hovels, and we have no material means. We have to fall back upon the voluntary assistance of teachers, but when I look for teachers, they are very few, especially, teachers of the type wanted, in order to draw the best from the children through understanding, through studying their individuality and then putting the child on its own resources, as it were, on its own honor. And believe me from my experience of hundreds, I was going to say thousands, of children I know that they have perhaps a finer sense of honor than you and I have.

The greatest lessons in life if we would but stoop and humble ourselves, we would learn not from grown-up learned men, but from the so-called ignorant children. Jesus never uttered a loftier or a grander truth than when he said that wisdom cometh out of the mouths of babes. I believe it; I have noticed it in my own experience that, if we would approach babes in humility and in innocence, we would learn wisdom from them.

I must not take up your time. I have simply given you what is, at the present moment, agitating me, namely, the delicate problem, considered in human terms, of drawing out the best from these millions of children of whom I have told you. But I have learned this one lesson - that what is impossible with man is child's play with God and, if we have faith in that Divinity which presides over the destiny of the meanest of His creation, I have no doubt that all things are possible and in that final hope I live and pass my time and endeavor to obey His will. Therefore, I repeat that even as you, out of your love for children, are endeavoring to teach those children, through your numerous institutions, the best that can be brought out of them, even so I hope that it will be possible not only for the children of the wealthy and the well-to-do, but for the children of paupers to receive training of this nature. You have very truly remarked that if we are to reach real peace in this world and if we are to carry on a real war against war, we shall have to begin with children and if they will grow up in their natural innocence, we won't have the struggle, we won't have to pass fruitless idle resolutions, but we shall go from love to love and peace to peace, until at last all the corners of the world are covered with that peace and love for which, consciously or unconsciously, the whole world is hungering.

Reposted from the Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace website

Posted on June 10, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Articles, Elementary, Primary, Resources.