17th Century Learning

It's always fascinating to see the context of our work. Below is an excerpt from a great article regarding what many consider to be the first picture book dedicated to the education of young children, Orbis Sensualium Pictus – or The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures, as it was rendered in English in 1705.

The researcher Charles McNamara explores how the book can be seen to be as much about the invisible world as the visible--a theme that probably resonates with a lot of Montessorians.

John Comenius’ Orbis Sensualium Pictus (or The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures) is, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, “the first children’s picture book.” Originally published in 1658 in Latin and German, the Orbis — with its 150 pictures showing everyday activities like brewing beer, tending gardens, and slaughtering animals — is immediately familiar as an ancestor of today’s children’s literature. This approach centered on the visual was a breakthrough in education for the young, as was the decision to teach the vernacular in addition to Latin. Unlike treatises on education and grammatical handbooks, it is aimed directly at the young and attempts to engage on their level.

The Orbis was hugely popular. At one point it was the most used textbook in Europe for elementary education, and according to one account it was translated into “most European and some of the Oriental languages.” Its author John Comenius, a Czech by birth, was also well-known throughout Europe and worked in several countries as a school reformer. His portrait was painted by Rembrandt, and according to an 1887 edition of the Orbis, Comenius was even “once solicited to become President of Harvard College.” Even if he is less celebrated today by name, his innovative ideas about education are still influential. In his Didactica Magna, for example, he advocates for equal educational opportunities for all: boys and girls, rich and poor, urban and rural.

Illustration for the sounds, from the 1705 English edition of Orbis Sensualium Pictus

Despite his progressive aims and lasting educational influence, Comenius does not come off as a thoroughly modern schoolmaster. When we turn to the first page of the Orbis, we find an opening sentence that would seem peculiar in today’s children’s books: “Come, boy, learn to be wise.” We see above the text a teacher and student in dialogue, the former holding up his finger and sporting a cane and large hat, the latter listening in an emotional state somewhere between awe and anxiety. The student asks, “What doth this mean, to be wise?” His teacher answers, “To understand rightly, to do rightly, and to speak out rightly all that are necessary.”

The first chapter of the Orbis looks to the third of these goals in what reads like an early version of “Old MacDonald Had a Farm.” Children learn how “to speak out rightly” by imitating animal noises. These two pages are a trove of Latin onomatopoetic verbs and peculiar renderings of animal sounds: cats cry out “nau nau” instead of “meow meow,” and we learn that “the Duck quacketh," “the Hare squeaketh," and “the Crow crieth.” This introduction to animal noises is familiar territory for modern educational toys. The teacher explains that first the student must learn “the plain sounds…which living creatures know how to make, and thy tongue knoweth how to imitate.” After mastering these noises, the student and teacher “will go into the World, and we will view all things.”

After thirty-five chapters on theology, elements, plants, and animals, Comenius finally introduces man. He again opts for the Biblical account and addresses Adam and Eve before more immediate topics like “The Outward Parts of a Man,” where we learn that women have “two Dugs” and that below the stomach we find “the Groyn and the privities.” The anatomical terminology is vast, including words for each finger and for a number of bones in the body. But amid instruction on the corporeal and familiar, Comenius again injects the abstract and invisible into his picture book with Chapter 43, a discussion of “The Soul of Man.” A dotted outline of a human, opening his arms as if to welcome the students’ gaze, stands at the top of the page. Despite this illustration, Comenius’ discussion of the soul is not dumbed down for children. He lays out the categories of souls for his young students: the “Vegetative” soul of plants, the “Sensitive” soul of animals, and the “Rational” soul of man.

Illustration for “The Soul”

Opening illustration of Master and Child

Opening illustration of Master and Child

The final page, mirroring the first, again shows the teacher speaking and the young student listening attentively. But in his second appearance, the student says nothing: we might say Comenius’ lesson was not a matter of dialogue and discussion but of assiduous memorization. The teacher, too, seems to have changed his approach. He tells the student, “thou hast seen in short, all things that can be shewed,” but he recommends that the student also “read other good Books diligently” so that he may become “learned, wise, and godly.”

Read the original full article here.

Let Your Baby Teach US!

**Thank you to all the people that contacted us--We are no longer looking for additional infants.**

Montessori Northwest invites you to a very special opportunity to enrich your child’s earliest experiences! 

Download a flyer here.

Download a flyer here.

Our Assistants to Infancy course trains adults to care for children from birth to three years of age. As part of their training, our students participate in observing and supervised practice teaching with infants and toddlers. 

What to Expect

In a warm, home-like setting, students gently care for your baby’s needs: playing, feeding, soothing, changing, and assisting with sleep, under the supervision of experienced teachers using Montessori principles. Other students observe from a discreet distance. You remain close by, observing or participating as you and baby feel comfortable. Please note that this if for babies 0 - 10 months old.

Meet Your Montessorians

Participating parents receive support and guidance from Montessori teacher trainer Nancy Lechner and experienced course assistants, with many opportunities to discuss questions about your child’s growth and development. 

Nancy has worked with young children since 1977, and holds diplomas from the Association Montessori Internationale at the Assistant to Infancy, Primary, and Special Education levels. She has presented parent workshops and staff development in California, Oregon, Texas, Australia, and Europe.

Nancy will be assisted by Gloria Singh & Morgan Spivey

Times, Dates, and other Details

  • July 7 to August 1, 2014
  • Monday to Friday, 9AM-11:30AM Montessori Northwest
  • 622 SE Grand Ave, Portland, OR 97214 **Free of charge to participating families** 

Space is limited; preference is given to those who can commit to the entire four week session. If you are interested in participating, please contact Gloria Singh, Course Assistant, at gloria@montessori-nw.org or call Montessori Northwest at (503) 963-8992. 

 

 

Posted on June 10, 2014 .

Gandhi Speaks at Montessori Training College

Speech At Montessori Training College 
Mohandas K. Gandhi

London , [ October 28, 1931 ]

(Note: Dr. Maria Montessori met Mahatma Gandhi in the beginning of October, 1931 in London. And on October 28, 1931 Gandhi spoke at the Montessori Training College in London where Dr. Montessori was also in attendance. What follows is the text of Gandhi’s Speech, which was published in the weekly newspaper, Young India, on November 19, 1931. For further information and/or discussions on this topic, please contact Shall Sinha at shall@ssinha.com )

Madame, you have overwhelmed me with your words. It is perfectly true, I must admit it in all humility, that however indifferently it may be, I endeavor to represent love in every fiber of my being. I am impatient to realize the presence of my Maker, Who to me embodies Truth, and in the early part of my career I discovered that if I was to realize Truth I must obey, even at the cost of my life, the law of love. And having been blessed with children, I discovered that the law of Love could be best understood and learned through little children.

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Were it not for us, their ignorant poor parents, our children would be perfectly innocent. I believe implicitly that the child is not born mischievous in the bad sense of the term. If parents would behave themselves whilst the child is growing, before it is born and after, it is a well-known fact that the child would instinctively obey the law of Truth and the law of Love.

And when I understood this lesson in the early part of my life, I began a gradual but distinct change in life. I do not propose to describe to you the several phases through which this stormy life of mine has passed, but I can only, in truth and in perfect humility, bear witness to the fact that to the extent that I have represented Love in my life, in thought, word and deed I have realized the “peace that passeth understanding”. I have baffled many of my friends when they have noticed in me peace that they have envied, and they have asked me for the cause of that priceless possession. I have not been able to explain the cause by saying that, if my friends found that peace in me, it was due to my attempt to obey this, the greatest law of our being.

It was in 1915 when I reached India , that I first became acquainted with your activities. It was in a place called Amreli that I found that there was a little school being conducted after the Montessori system. Your name had preceded that first acquaintance. I found no difficulty in finding out at once that this school was not carrying out the spirit of your teaching; the letter was there, but whilst there was an honest - more or less honest - effort being made, I saw too that there was a great deal of tinsel about it. I came in touch, then, with more such schools, and the more I came in touch, the more I began to understand that the foundation was good and splendid, if the children could be taught through the laws of nature - nature, consistent with human dignity, not nature that governs the beast. I felt instinctively from the way in which the children were being taught that, whilst they were being indifferently taught, the original teaching was conceived in obedience to this fundamental law. Since then, I have had the pleasure of coming across several of your pupils, one of whom had even made a pilgrimage to Italy and had received your personal blessings. I was looking forward to meeting the children here and you all and it was a great pleasure to me to see these children.

I had taken care to learn something about these little children. I had a foretaste of what I saw here, in Birmingham , where there is a school between which and this there is a difference. But I also saw that there also human nature was struggling to express itself. I see the same thing here and it was a matter of inexpressible joy to me that from their childhood the children were brought to understand the virtue of silence, and how, in response to the whisper from their teacher, the children came forward one after another in that pin-drop silence. It gave great joy to see all those beautiful rhythmic movements and, as I was watching those movements of the children, my whole heart went out to the millions of the children of the semi-starved villages of India, and I asked myself as my heart went out to those children, “Is it possible for me to give them those lessons and the training that are being given under your system, to those children”?

We are conducting an experiment amongst the poorest of the children in India . I do not know how far the experiment will go. We have the problem of giving real vital education to these children of India 's hovels, and we have no material means. We have to fall back upon the voluntary assistance of teachers, but when I look for teachers, they are very few, especially, teachers of the type wanted, in order to draw the best from the children through understanding, through studying their individuality and then putting the child on its own resources, as it were, on its own honor. And believe me from my experience of hundreds, I was going to say thousands, of children I know that they have perhaps a finer sense of honor than you and I have.

The greatest lessons in life if we would but stoop and humble ourselves, we would learn not from grown-up learned men, but from the so-called ignorant children. Jesus never uttered a loftier or a grander truth than when he said that wisdom cometh out of the mouths of babes. I believe it; I have noticed it in my own experience that, if we would approach babes in humility and in innocence, we would learn wisdom from them.

I must not take up your time. I have simply given you what is, at the present moment, agitating me, namely, the delicate problem, considered in human terms, of drawing out the best from these millions of children of whom I have told you. But I have learned this one lesson - that what is impossible with man is child's play with God and, if we have faith in that Divinity which presides over the destiny of the meanest of His creation, I have no doubt that all things are possible and in that final hope I live and pass my time and endeavor to obey His will. Therefore, I repeat that even as you, out of your love for children, are endeavoring to teach those children, through your numerous institutions, the best that can be brought out of them, even so I hope that it will be possible not only for the children of the wealthy and the well-to-do, but for the children of paupers to receive training of this nature. You have very truly remarked that if we are to reach real peace in this world and if we are to carry on a real war against war, we shall have to begin with children and if they will grow up in their natural innocence, we won't have the struggle, we won't have to pass fruitless idle resolutions, but we shall go from love to love and peace to peace, until at last all the corners of the world are covered with that peace and love for which, consciously or unconsciously, the whole world is hungering.

Reposted from the Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace website

Posted on June 10, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Articles, Elementary, Primary, Resources.

Press Release: Heavily Decorated Classrooms Disrupt Attention and Learning In Young Children, According To New Carnegie Mellon Research

PITTSBURGH—Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls. However, new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children.

Published in Psychological Science, Carnegie Mellon's Anna V. FisherKarrie E. Godwin and Howard Seltman looked at whether classroom displays affected children's ability to maintain focus during instruction and to learn the lesson content. They found that children in highly decorated classrooms were more distracted, spent more time off-task and demonstrated smaller learning gains than when the decorations were removed.

"Young children spend a lot of time — usually the whole day — in the same classroom, and we have shown that a classroom's visual environment can affect how much children learn," said Fisher, lead author and associate professor of psychology in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Should teachers take down their visual displays based on the findings of this study?

"We do not suggest by any means that this is the answer to all educational problems. Furthermore, additional research is needed to know what effect the classroom visual environment has on children's attention and learning in real classrooms," Fisher said "Therefore, I would suggest that instead of removing all decorations, teachers should consider whether some of their visual displays may be distracting to young children."

For the study, 24 kindergarten students were placed in laboratory classrooms for six introductory science lessons on topics they were unfamiliar with. Three lessons were taught in a heavily decorated classroom, and three lessons were given in a sparse classroom.

The results showed that while children learned in both classroom types, they learned more when the room was not heavily decorated. Specifically, children's accuracy on the test questions was higher in the sparse classroom (55 percent correct) than in the decorated classroom (42 percent correct).

"We were also interested in finding out if the visual displays were removed, whether the children's attention would shift to another distraction, such as talking to their peers, and if the total amount of time they were distracted would remain the same," said Godwin, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology and fellow of the Program in Interdisciplinary Education Research (PIER).

However, when the researchers tallied all of the time children spent off-task in both types of classrooms, the rate of off-task behavior was higher in the decorated classroom (38.6 percent time spent off-task) than in the sparse classroom (28.4 percent time spent off-task).

The researchers hope these findings lead to further studies into developing guidelines to help teachers optimally design classrooms.

The Institute of Education Sciences, part of the U.S. Department of Education, funded this research.

Last fall, CMU launched the Simon Initiative to accelerate the use of learning science and technology to improve student learning. Named to honor the work of the late Nobel Laureate and CMU Professor Herbert Simon, the initiative will harness CMU's decades of learning data and research to improve educational outcomes for students everywhere.

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Published in Psychological Science, CMU researchers looked at whether classroom displays affected children’s ability to maintain focused attention during instruction and to learn the lesson content. They found that children in highly decorated classrooms (bottom image) were more distracted, spent more time off-task and demonstrated smaller learning gains than when the decorations were removed (top image).

This article originally published on http://www.cmu.edu

Posted on June 6, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Elementary, Articles, Primary, Resources.

Montessori Northwest Collaborates to Bring Montessori to At-Risk Children

MNW proudly announces a new collaboration with the Volunteers Of America Oregon Family Relief Nursery, pursuing our goal to improve families’ access to high-quality Montessori education.

The Family Relief Nursery, a program of Volunteers of America, strengthens fragile families at risk of abuse or neglect; serving around ninety families at a time for an average of eighteen months. The Nursery provides therapeutic classrooms for children ages six weeks to five years and respite for parents to make progress on personal goals. Children are provided meals and transportation to and from the Nursery, and parents receive home visits, education, and support services—all at no cost.

Last year MNW’s Community Networking Coordinator met the Program Director of the Relief Nursery, Anne Rothert, only to discover that she has a background in Montessori education and incorporates several key principles into the program.  Through some follow-up conversations and visits, a partnership was established for Montessori Northwest to provide some additional training and professional development to supplement their great work. Several Relief Nursery staff members will begin by taking the AMI Assistants Course this summer and will have ongoing support throughout the year from Montessori Northwest teacher trainers and community volunteers.  Gently used Montessori materials for use in the Nursery classrooms will also be collected.

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Here at Montessori Northwest, we are thrilled by the opportunity to contribute to the work already being done by the Family Relief Nursery.  Originally designed over a century ago for children living in the tenement neighborhoods of Rome, Montessori programs take an approach to developmental learning that is particularly well suited to the needs of children in at-risk populations. Montessori has a track record of preparing children for success in school, career, community and life—producing smart, well-rounded and successful individuals regardless of socio-economic status, learning differences or physical disabilities.  (More information about Montessori outcomes can be found HERE)

A recent evaluation by Portland State University documented that families who received Relief Nursery services had fewer child welfare reports and also fewer foster care placements, compared to before entering the program. We are confident that the synergy of these two stellar programs will have tangible results for Oregon families.  

If you are interested in supporting this partnership with a donation of time, Montessori materials or funding, please contact jennifer@montessori-nw.org for more information.

**UPDATED INFORMATION--Due to an overwhelmingly positive response to this announcement we are taking a few moments to organize the many generous offers of time and resources.  We still need your support.  Additional information will be announced via our Email newsletter. (Sign up here.) Thank you all!**

**INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING? Click here.

Posted on May 30, 2014 .

Public Domain Review…A Great Resource...

As educators, we often find ourselves looking for unique and beautiful images to inspire the curiosity of children. In this vein, we wanted to highlight a great free resource.

Founded in 2011, The Public Domain Review is an online journal and not-for-profit project dedicated to promoting and celebrating the public domain in all its richness and variety.

All works eventually fall out of copyright – from classics works of art to absentminded doodles – and in doing so they enter the public domain, a vast commons of material that everyone is free to enjoy, share and build upon without restriction. Their aim is to help our readers explore this rich terrain – like a small exhibition gallery at the entrance to an immense network of archives and storage rooms that lie beyond.

The galleries above are just a hint at the diversity and wonderment of this collection--We hope you'll continue exploring the Public Domain Review!


 

Posted on May 28, 2014 and filed under A-to-I, Elementary, From MNW Staff, Primary, Resources.

New Play Area to Open at Silver Falls, Oregon

Originally published in the Statesman Journal.

Officials at Silver Falls State Park are taking aim at the growing problem of "nature deficit disorder" in today's children with the creation of a new natural play area at Oregon's largest state park.

Described as a quarter-mile loop with adventure pods where children can safely climb a tree, hide in a cougar den, growl like a bear or weave a bird's nest, the natural play area is having its grand opening May 31.

"Connecting kids to the outdoors is a critically important thing to do, for a whole host of reasons," said Oregon Parks and Recreation director Lisa Van Laanen. "When you camp, picnic and play outdoors a lot as a child, it creates a lifelong love of the outdoors. And that's good for everybody."

The grand opening is 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 31, 2014, at the North Falls Group Camp area. There will be guided tours, refreshments and a short ceremony with a tree planting. Parking fees at the North Falls Group Camp parking lot will be waived for the duration of the event.

The play area has been more than five years in the making. Planners conducted design workshops in 2008 and 2009. Trail construction began in 2010.

The development unveiled May 31 represents phase one of development, with the possibility of another pod within the next year.

Additional information Silver Falls State Park can be found here.

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Montessori in the Square 2014


On July 30th, 2014, Montessori Northwest will once again offer “Montessori in the Square,” a public glass classroom event held in the heart of downtown Portland.

This highly-visible celebration of Montessori education will feature three large interactive Montessori classrooms, activities for children, and information for parents. Trainers and guides will be on hand to assist viewers with questions.

But don't take our word for it--see for yourself below.

This video from last year's Montessori in the Square provided by ChildPeace Montessori.

Frozen

It is inherent in the nature of children to love their time and place, and boy do they love the movie Frozen.

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In the spirit of exploring ways to channel children’s interest in support of each child’s development (see our Primary trainers’ blog post on popular culture and holidays found here), we were struck by how thrilling it would be for a child to discover that they can compose a song from Frozen on the Bells!

The famous ICEHOTEL in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden

The famous ICEHOTEL in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden

Also, look at the amazing potential below for true stories about how beautiful structures can indeed be made completely of ice.  How else have you and the children channeled and enjoyed Frozen in Montessori environments?

Posted on May 21, 2014 and filed under Articles, Elementary, From MNW Staff, Primary, Resources.

A Note from Polli Soholt

- Learn more about the Assistants Course here -

Earlier this spring, I was in Portland for a Montessori conference, and was able to spend time at Montessori Northwest. It is always a treat to come to Portland, because of the city itself, but especially because of the vibrant Montessori community surrounding the training center. This June I will be returning to Portland to lead an AMI Assistants Course at MNW. For those not as familiar with this course, I thought I’d take a moment to give you a clearer vision of what to expect.

During the AMI Assistants Course, participants are introduced to Montessori principles and how those principles are reflected in the practice with the children. We spend time practicing art techniques that we can use with children; learning songs and finger plays to introduce to the children; exploring children’s literature; and making materials for the children to enjoy.

Making materials is one of my favorite elements of the course because we allow time for the students to make some card materials by hand. We provide everything needed to make these cards and adequate class time to complete them. These cards aid the children in their vocabulary development, and they use them later for reading practice. Each set of cards focuses on a topic that is interesting to young children such as vehicles, buildings, or tools. I really enjoy seeing the adults in the course come to appreciate the value of these unique cards as well as experience a sense of accomplishment as they progress in the process. The children will be aware that these special materials were made by hand, just for them!

I have found that the participants of this course are genuinely interested in child development and are searching for more meaningful educational principles to support the children in their development. Assistants, parents, administrators, and traditional educators all find value in the Montessori theory and practice, and are able to take away information and skills that will aid them in their homes, schools, and classrooms. I look forward to introducing this information to a new group of people in Portland, and hope you will consider joining us on this adventure.

AMI Assistants Course at Montessori Northwest

June 16th - 27th, 2014

- Learn more about the Assistants Course here -

A Montessori Morning

A fantastic link to share with parents of Casa-aged children!

This video compresses a great morning's work by four year old Jackson Palmer into a short and fun-to-watch summary of his three hour, uninterrupted work cycle. We've learned that the best way to talk about Montessori is sometimes not to talk at all, but to show.

Video reposted from the FaceBook page of  www.MariaMontessori.com

Educateurs san Frontières

Montessori Education for Social Change, Empowering Communities, Enabling Children

Educateurs sans Frontières ® (EsF) is a division of the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) dedicated to assisting children through the Montessori approach to education. EsF is Montessori without Borders © and is committed to working with individuals, families, communities, organisations, and governments to champion the rights, education and welfare of children worldwide. More information on EsF can be found here.

What is EsF?

EsF is an AMI programme in which participants revisit the principles and practices from the perspective of society at large; as individuals the participants will contribute to the aims of AMI.

Functioning as a social movement that will strive to obtain recognition for the rights of the child throughout the world, irrespective of race, religion, political and social beliefs; cooperating with other bodies and organisations which further the development of education, human rights, and peace.


The Fourth Assembly of EsF happens this year!

6 - 20 July, 2014
Inpawa Hotel Ban Phai, Khon Kaen, Thailand


The Association Montessori Internationale organizes EsF assemblies, gatherings and orientations to bring the benefits of Montessori education to more children.

Major assemblies are held every three years and serve as milestones in the development of AMI's Educateurs sans Frontières work.

Learn more about the 2014 EsF Assembly in Thailand by downloading this flyer.

Learn more about the 2014 EsF Assembly in Thailand by downloading this flyer.


Montessori Mention in the Latest Council for American Private Education Newsletter

A nice mention of Montessori in an article regarding grants for Pre-School programs, published in the newsletter of the Council for American Private Education Newsletter.

(Download and read the full newsletter here.)

Preschool Grants

When she met with CAPE’s board of directors and state representatives last month, Libby Doggett, deputy assistant secretary for policy and early learning at the U.S. Department of Education, urged the CAPE community to weigh in on the public discussion regarding the design of the new Preschool Development Grants competition.

The private school community responded in force, with various CAPE member organizations and CAPE itself offering comments at a public meeting March 20 and through an online forum established to solicit input.

CAPE’s comments called for the new grants program to be open to diverse approaches to early education, observing that there is “no single combination of activities, lessons, methods, and settings best suited for all children in all circumstances.”

Specifically, CAPE recommended that the federal government require as an explicit condition for receiving a grant, “that a state’s quality rating system, professional development requirements, training and credentialing requirements, curriculum guidelines, even health and safety standards respect and accommodate a variety of truly distinctive approaches to quality early education, including those practiced in Montessori programs, faith-based programs, and Waldorf programs.”

Montessori programs, which are universally recognized as a time-honored, high-quality approach to education, sometimes run into difficulties in states that insist on a one-size-fits-all approach to pre-K. State standards can undermine the pedagogy and theory of child development espoused by the Montessori community.

The competition should insist that such standards only be developed “in consultation with representatives from the diverse early education community,” said CAPE. 

Download and read the full newsletter here.

Posted on May 9, 2014 and filed under Articles, Resources.

Thank You!

MNW's 2013-2014 Elementary and Primary Academic Year students.

A huge “Thank You” to our incredible Montessori community for sharing your wisdom and experience with our 61 primary and elementary MNW students during observation and practice teaching this year!

We couldn’t do it without you; and, thanks to your patience and generosity, when each of these students has a class of 25, that’s 1,525 children who can have a Montessori education next year!

 

Alcuin School
Bethany Village Montessori
Camas Montessori School
Cascadia Montessori School
Chestnut Grove Montessori Children’s House
Childpeace Montessori School
Community Roots School
Corvallis Montessori School
Franciscan Montessori Earth School
Good Shepherd Montessori
Harmony Montessori
Hershey Montessori School
Laurelhurst Montessori School
Lewis and Clark Montessori Charter School
Lighthouse Montessori
Little Oak Montessori School
Meher Montessori
Montessori Children’s House of Portland
Montessori House of St. Johns
Montessori in Redlands
Montessori School of Beaverton
Montessori Pathways
Northwest Montessori
Ottowa Montessori School
Pacific Crest Montessori School
Pioneer Meadows Montessori School
Portland Montessori Collaborative
Portland Montessori School
Puddletown Montessori School
The Renaissance International School
Sellwood Montessori School
Squamish Montessori
SunGarden Montessori School
Sunstone Montessori School
Three Tree Montessori School
Tiny Revolution Montessori School
West Hills Montessori School
Whole Child Montessori Center